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Treasures of the Archives: Governor Clarence D. Martin’s House

Clarence D. Martin Alumni House, Eastern Washington University. The Real Property Record Cards Collection, bulk dates: 1940 through 2004. Washington State Archives, Digital Archives.

Clarence D. Martin Alumni House, Eastern Washington University. The Real Property Record Cards Collection, bulk dates: 1940 through 2004. Washington State Archives, Digital Archives, http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov.

Clarence D. Martin was one of Washington State’s most remarkable and influential governors. He was born in the small town of Cheney, Washington, and was serving as Mayor of Cheney when he won his bid to become Governor of the State, serving 1933 -1941. He continued to serve both as Mayor of Cheney and as the Governor from 1933 to 1936, commuting back to Cheney from Olympia at the end of each legislative session. After his time as Governor, Martin was appointed as a State Representative representing the 5th Legislative District in 1944, and later returning to the position of Cheney City Council Member, 1950-1952.

Treasures of the Archives: Tooth Pullers of Early Washington

George Barnett, Professional License Records, Department of Licensing, Business and Professions Division, Dental License Applications, 1888, 1909-1936, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives.

George Barnett, Professional License Records, Department of Licensing, Business and Professions Division, Dental License Applications, 1888, 1909-1936, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives, http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov.

In 1888, the Legislature of Washington Territory passed an act to create the Territorial Board of Dental Examiners. Until that time, it was simply a matter of hoping for the best when going under the dentist's drill. Many dental practitioners of the 19th century, such as Walla Walla resident George E. Barnett seen above, practiced without a license or any formal education. Barnett lists an apprenticeship of one year at the University of Pennsylvania as his official training. As proof that he had been in practice for two years, Barnett provides witnesses, including one L.H. Barnett, very likely a close relative. The Dental License Applications, 1888, 1909-1936 collection is a fascinating little piece of early Washington history, useful for genealogy or general interest.

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