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Treasures of the Archives: Edith Boyd Recalls the Indians of Early Spokane

Caption: Spokane pioneer and educator Edith Boyd, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives.

Spokane pioneer and educator Edith Boyd, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives, http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov.

Edith Boyd (1874-1972) came to Spokane in 1894. In this 1970 interview (completed when Boyd was 96 years old), she recalls many colorful stories about the presence of Native Americans on the streets of Spokane in the 1890s and 1900s, when “blanket-draped figures walked the town streets”. Her memories are evocative and very specific, including the location of Indian camps, and the work Indians performed in town. Have a listen.

Treasures of the Archives: Kettle Falls: Moving on Up

Truck Towing House on Trailer, 1900-1940, unknown photographer, scpa00800001032, Kettle Falls History Center Photographs, Crossroads on the Columbia Collection, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives.

Truck Towing House on Trailer, 1900-1940, unknown photographer, scpa00800001032, Kettle Falls History Center Photographs, Crossroads on the Columbia Collection, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives, http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov.

Link to photo: http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/Record/View/92F2AB61318ACA3B9E87FFDE0FD16482

This house moved slowly up the hill to avoid the flooding waters of Lake Roosevelt. In mid-1941 the waters of the Columbia River began to rise behind the Grand Coulee Dam, covering the arid landscape with hundreds of feet of water. The filling of the reservoir behind the 550 foot Grand Coulee Dam forced every animal, plant, and human that called the river banks home to relocate and change their way of life.

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